Get Your Child the Financial Support They Need

Call a child support attorney in St. Augustine, Florida

Your divorce requires you to figure out different arrangements for your children. Child support is a very important element of any divorce. If you have primary custody over your child, you need your partner to provide financial support for their well-being. Non-custodial parents are often required to make payments for their child’s support.

Thibault Law can assist you with your child custody case in St. Augustine, Florida and the surrounding area. Call us today for compassionate assistance in your complex case.

Answering your questions and guiding you through your case

We have extensive experience representing parents in child custody cases. We can assist with every aspect of the arrangements. Call our attorney today if you need help:

  • Establishing your child custody arrangements
  • Modifying or enforcing your arrangements 
  • Filing action against your partner for missed payments, etc. 

Thibault Law can assist parents on both sides of the child custody battle. Contact our family law office in St. Augustine, Florida today for assistance.

Relocation and Child Custody in St. Augustine, FL:

Don't put the future of your child at risk hire Thibault Law

Relocation and Child Custody in St. Augustine, FL:

  • A court in Florida will only agree to one parent relocating with a child or children if an agreement is written and signed by both parents that:
  • Consents to the relocation.
  • Details the time-sharing schedule for the parent that is not relocating.
  • Details transportation arraignments related to time-sharing.
  • The relocating parent must serve a signed petition to the other parent as soon as possible, the petition has to include:
  • The address, phone number, and a description of the new place.
  • The date of the move.
  • A statement on why they need to move.

Modification of a Child Custody order in St. Augustine, FL:
A child custody order in St. Augustine, Florida will not be modified unless a parent or a third party (guardian ad litem) can show a substantial, material, or unanticipated change in circumstances. The modification in the order must go towards the child's best interests.